Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Notes


Note for:   Robert Miller,   1751 -          Index
[Henry Family Tree.FTW]

This is a quote from "More than 200 Descendants Attend Henry Family Renunion: Sketch of Life of James Henry of Interest. The following is a sketch of life of James Henry, written and delivered at the reunion by Jessie Merle (Henry) Franklin, great- grand-daughter of James Henry.

"Jeanette's father, Robert Miller, was born in Ayrshire county, Scotland in 1751. He was well educated and of brilliant mind. Coming to America just before the American Revolution, he lost his leg in the Battle of Yorktown in 1781 just before Cornwallis surrendered. Robert Henry, one of James' boys often said that the James Henry family woed its brains to the Miller side. This is not intended as a reflection one way or another, but is given as one man's opinion. It was told that the older generation, James' children, that Mr. Miller, their maternal grandfather, was a friend of Robert Burns, the great lyric poet of Scotland. How regrettable that we do not know for sure: A check on fact shows that Robert Burns was also born in Ayrshire County, Scotland, in 1759, making him eight years younger that

Another member of the Henry family has Robert Miller born in 1760 in Antrim, Ireland, came to America at the age of 11. At 17 he fought in the Battle of King's Mountain. He was severely wonded bout fought again. Jenett White was also born in Antrim, Ireland.




Notes


Note for:   Maggie Rebecca Henry,   1862 -          Index
[Henry Family Tree.FTW]

When he mother Maggie Catherwood Henry died in 1860 she was the only child to livve with Roberts second wife Maggie young.

Notes


Note for:   Johnson Mawhinney,   BET. 1782 - 1857 -          Index
[Henry Family Tree.FTW]

Johnson was killed in the Civil War. James took some of his children to rear.

Notes


Note for:   John White,   1720 -          Index
Burial:   
     Place:   Fairfield County, South Carolina

Note:    [Henry Family Tree.FTW]

John White at age forty-seven, and his wife Ann Garner, at age forty, brought their six children, ages three to fourteen from Ballymena, County Antrim, Ireland to Charleston, South Carolina aboard the ship "Earl of Donegal" landing 12/22/1767. They settled in Chester County, South Carolina on a grant of land received from King George III.

It is believed John White was killed in an Indian battle in Fairfield County, South Carolina and buried there. Date is unknown. Ann White died 1/25/1818. She and at least five of their children are buried in the Old Purity Presbyterian Church Cemetery southeast of Chester, South Carolina.

Notes


Note for:   Ann Garner,   1727 - 25 JAN 1818         Index
Burial:   
     Date:   1818
     Place:   old Purity Presbyterian Church Cemetery, sourth east of Chester, South Carolina



Notes


Note for:   Elizabeth Sharon Downing,   30 JUN 1798 - 1883         Index
Burial:   
     Place:   Seale Cem., Benchley, Brazos, Texas

Note:    [Henry Family Tree.FTW]

Elizabeth Downing was a niece of Lord Downing of London. She was well educated for a girl of her day and possessed a keen interest in the arts of healing. Her enjoyment of sports was considered most unusual in that age. However, these traits were to stand her in good stead during her future life on the Texas wilderness.

Robert and Elizabeth were married in Londonderry, Irland on June 3rd 1820. As Ulster Presbyterians they were persecuted from all sides. It was imperative that they leave Irelend.

Word reached them of a land across the ocen called Texas, where the Mexican Government offered a league and labor of land to all who would colonize this wilderness, and the pursuit of that offer, Passage had been booked on the next ship sailing to America. Immediately following their wedding.

They migrated across Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana, to arrive in Texas. Once their home was completed, Elizabeth longed for the worship services she had attneded as a gir. Knowing full weel that Protestant church services were illegal in the Catholic, Mexican Territory, she and Robert invited groups of neighbors to their little cabin for bible reading, prayer and worship. People attending the worship were divided into two groups. One stood watch while the other prayed. It was necessary to watch for Indians attacking or stealing their horses, and to watch for the Mexicans. The Henry Bible was passed down many generations.